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dc.contributor.authorDuncan, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNahas, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorAkhtar, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorDaurka, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-10T16:55:57Z
dc.date.available2015-01-28en_US
dc.date.issued2015-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2016-09-12T23:14:03.214Z
dc.identifier.issn2250-0685en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/20121
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Surgical management of acetabular fractures is often highly complex, and a successful outcome depends upon an appreciation of the fracture pattern and the most appropriate approach to reduce and hold it. Currently, computed tomography (CT) images are used in conjunction with plain x-rays to identify the main fracture components and their spatial relationship to one another, and as such surgeons still have to make decisions based upon their ability to visualise the fracture from the images available. 3D printers have now become widely available and inexpensive, and can be used to rapidly produce life-size models based on CT scans of an individual patient. The availability of patient specific, accurate and detailed models of complex acetabular fractures can aid planning of surgical management on a patient specific basis. CASE REPORT: This report describes the use of a 3D printer to create a life-size model reconstruction of the pelvis of a 48 year old male patient who sustained a left sided associated both column acetabular fracture following a motorbike accident in the Sahara Desert. The model allowed visualisation of the multiple fracture fragments and their relative displacements. The tactile feedback allowed assessment of the different fracture fragments. The relative displacement of the quadrilateral plate and posterior column fragments could be assessed and the surgeon felt that these would be amenable to reduction from an ilioinguinal approach. An anatomic reduction was achieved and was held with the application of a pelvic brim plate with 2 screws lagging the posterior column/quadrilateral plate fragment. CONCLUSION: There are previous examples of 3D models being used in orthopaedic surgery through the use of rapid prototyping, however this method is usually expensive and time consuming. Advances in 3D printer technology offer surgeons a number of advantages when treating these complex fractures. With the ever-increasing economy, ease of use and speed of additive processing, the possible applications of this technology within orthopaedic surgery are numerous. Given the possible applications of this technology, and its ever increasing availability, we feel that its use can only improve patient outcomes and so should be explored further for use in orthopaedic surgery.en_US
dc.format.extent23 - 25en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJ Orthop Case Repen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC
dc.subject3D printingen_US
dc.subjectacetabular reconstructionen_US
dc.subjecttraumaen_US
dc.titleThe Use of a 3D Printer in Pre-operative Planning for a Patient Requiring Acetabular Reconstructive Surgery.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© 2015 Indian Orthopaedic Research Group
dc.identifier.doi10.13107/jocr.2250-0685.247en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27299013en_US
pubs.issue1en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute/Neuroscience and Trauma
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume5en_US


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