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dc.contributor.authorTong, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBudde, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorGill, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorJosephson, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarson, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorPruett, TLen_US
dc.contributor.authorReese, PPen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosenbloom, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorRostaing, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWarrens, ANen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorCraig, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorHemmelgarn, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorManns, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorTugwell, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Biesen, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinkelmayer, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorEvangelidis, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorSautenet, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, JRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-09T13:19:59Z
dc.date.available2016-04-09en_US
dc.date.issued2016-06en_US
dc.date.submitted2016-08-17T15:55:52.359Z
dc.identifier.issn2373-8731en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/15116
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Although advances in treatment have dramatically improved short-term graft survival and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, long-term graft outcomes have not substantially improved. Transplant recipients also have a considerably increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infection, which all contribute to appreciable morbidity and premature mortality. Many trials in kidney transplantation are short-term, frequently use unvalidated surrogate endpoints, outcomes of uncertain relevance to patients and clinicians, and do not consistently measure and report key outcomes like death, graft loss, graft function, and adverse effects of therapy. This diminishes the value of trials in supporting treatment decisions that require individual-level multiple tradeoffs between graft survival and the risk of side effects, adverse events, and mortality. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation initiative aims to develop a core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation that is based on the shared priorities of all stakeholders. METHODS: This will include a systematic review to identify outcomes reported in randomized trials, a Delphi survey with an international multistakeholder panel (patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, members from industry) to develop a consensus-based prioritized list of outcome domains and a consensus workshop to review and finalize the core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Developing and implementing a core outcome set to be reported, at a minimum, in all kidney transplantation trials will improve the transparency, quality, and relevance of research; to enable kidney transplant recipients and their clinicians to make better-informed treatment decisions for improved patient outcomes.en_US
dc.format.extente79 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTransplant Directen_US
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at http://journals.lww.com/transplantationdirect/Fulltext/2016/06000/Standardized_Outcomes_in.10.aspx
dc.titleStandardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation: A Global Initiative to Develop a Core Outcome Set for Trials in Kidney Transplantation.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© 2016 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/TXD.0000000000000593en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27500269en_US
pubs.issue6en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
pubs.volume2en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-09en_US


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