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dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorVolpe, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatanov, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPriebe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiacco, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-02T14:31:02Z
dc.date.available2015-09-25en_US
dc.date.issued2015-10-12en_US
dc.date.submitted2015-11-19T11:29:07.607Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/9538
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Social networks are important for mental health outcomes as they can mobilise resources and help individuals to cope with social stressors. Individuals with psychosis may have specific difficulties in establishing and maintaining social relationships which impacts on their well-being and quality of life. There has been a growing interest in developing social network interventions for patients with psychotic disorders. A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate the size of social networks of patients with psychotic disorders, as well as their friendship networks. METHODS: A systematic electronic search was carried out in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsychINFO databases using a combination of search terms relating to 'social network', 'friendship' and 'psychotic disorder'. RESULTS: The search identified 23 relevant papers. Out of them, 20 reported patient social network size. Four papers reported the mean number of friends in addition to whole network size, while three further papers focused exclusively on the number of friends. Findings varied substantially across the studies, with a weighted mean size of 11.7 individuals for whole social networks and 3.4 individuals for friendship networks. On average, 43.1 % of the whole social network was composed of family members, while friends accounted for 26.5 %. CONCLUSIONS: Studies assessing whole social network size and friendship networks of people with psychosis are difficult to compare as different concepts and methods of assessment were applied. The extent of the overlap between different social roles assessed in the networks was not always clear. Greater conceptual and methodological clarity is needed in order to help the development of effective strategies to increase social resources of patients with psychosis.en_US
dc.format.extent560 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Res Notesen_US
dc.subjectFriendsen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectPsychotic Disordersen_US
dc.subjectSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleSocial networks of patients with psychosis: a systematic review.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13104-015-1528-7en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26459046en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute/Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF/REF - SMD - Wolfson
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF/Ref - UoA 02
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
pubs.volume8en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-09-25en_US


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