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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorMarinakis, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T10:21:21Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-08en_US
dc.date.submitted2015-11-30T14:11:29.334Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/9475
dc.description.abstractMicrowave radiation is a form of electromagnetic radiation. It covers, broadly speaking, frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz. For example a microwave oven operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and many mobile network providers use frequencies between 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz. Microwave radiation has many applications including telecommunications, microwave ovens for our kitchens, military purposes, radar technology and air traffic control, radio astronomy and navigation, and to generate plasma and energy. In London and Oxford we use microwave spectroscopy to study complexes of nitric oxide.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe acknowledge EPSRC Grant No. EP/H008403/1 awarded to Professor Brian J. Howard (Oxford University), the Centre for Public Engagement (Queen Mary, University of London) for funding, and Lis Carter for help in the recording.en_US
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcast
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcast
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcasten_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrowave studies of nitrosyl complexesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMicrowave studies of nitrosyl complexes
dc.rightsYou may not, without prior permission upload this Podcast to another website.
dc.subjectmicrowave radiationen_US
dc.subjectmicrowave ovenen_US
dc.subjectapplications of microwave radiationen_US
dc.subjectmicrowave spectroscopyen_US
dc.titleMicrowave Radiationen_US
dc.rights.holder(c) 2015 Marinakis, S and Howard, B
pubs.issueEpisode 1en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US


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