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dc.contributor.authorAntonelli, A
dc.contributor.authorNoort, WA
dc.contributor.authorJaques, J
dc.contributor.authorde Boer, B
dc.contributor.authorde Jong-Korlaar, R
dc.contributor.authorBrouwers-Vos, AZ
dc.contributor.authorLubbers-Aalders, L
dc.contributor.authorvan Velzen, JF
dc.contributor.authorBloem, AC
dc.contributor.authorYuan, H
dc.contributor.authorde Bruijn, JD
dc.contributor.authorOssenkoppele, GJ
dc.contributor.authorMartens, ACM
dc.contributor.authorVellenga, E
dc.contributor.authorGroen, RWJ
dc.contributor.authorSchuringa, JJ
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-09T12:19:50Z
dc.date.available2018-08-09T12:19:50Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-22
dc.date.submitted2017-02-25T10:25:28.234Z
dc.identifier.citationAntonelli, A., et al. (2016). "Establishing human leukemia xenograft mouse models by implanting human bone marrow–like scaffold-based niches." Blood 128(25): 2949-2959.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-4971
dc.identifier.other10.1182/blood-2016-05-719021
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/43204
dc.descriptionThis research was originally published in Blood Online. Antonelli, A., et al.. Title. Blood. Prepublished December 22, 2016.; https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2016-05-719021.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo begin to understand the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal, differentiation, and transformation of human hematopoietic stem cells or to evaluate the efficacy of novel treatment modalities, stem cells need to be studied in their own species-specific microenvironment. By implanting ceramic scaffolds coated with human mesenchymal stromal cells into immune-deficient mice, we were able to mimic the human bone marrow niche. Thus, we have established a human leukemia xenograft mouse model in which a large cohort of patient samples successfully engrafted, which covered all of the important genetic and risk subgroups. We found that by providing a humanized environment, stem cell self-renewal properties were better maintained as determined by serial transplantation assays and genome-wide transcriptome studies, and less clonal drift was observed as determined by exome sequencing. The human leukemia xenograft mouse models that we have established here will serve as an excellent resource for future studies aimed at exploring novel therapeutic approaches. (Blood. 2016;128(25):2949-2959)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Grant No. ERC-2011-StG 281474 from the European Research Council (J.J.S.) and by Grant No. VU2011-5127 from the Dutch Cancer Foundation (R.W.J.G.).en_US
dc.format.extent2949 - 2959
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Hematologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBLOOD
dc.subjecthuman hematopoietic stem cellsen_US
dc.subjectxenograft modelsen_US
dc.subjectleukemic stem cellsen_US
dc.titleEstablishing human leukemia xenograft mouse models by implanting human bone marrow-like scaffold-based nichesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderThe American Society of Hematology
pubs.author-urlhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000392655100014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=612ae0d773dcbdba3046f6df545e9f6a
pubs.declined2017-02-25T10:25:25.930+0000
pubs.deleted2017-02-25T10:25:25.930+0000
pubs.issue25
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Science & Engineering
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Science & Engineering/Engineering and Materials Science - Staff
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume128


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