Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWILLIAMS, DG
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-31T09:11:11Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-29
dc.date.issued2014-06-29
dc.date.issued2014-06-29
dc.identifier.issn1755-1722
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/jspui/handle/123456789/8062
dc.description.abstractIn the context of debates about liberalism and colonialism, the arguments of Adam Smith have been taken as illustrative of an important line of anti-colonial liberal thought. The reading of Smith presented here challenges this interpretation. It argues that Smith’s opposition to colonial rule derived largely from its impact on the metropole, rather than on its impact on the conquered and colonised; that Smith recognised colonialism had brought ‘improvement’ in conquered territories and that Smith struggled to balance recognition of moral diversity with a universal moral framework and a commitment to a particular interpretation of progress through history. These arguments have a wider significance as they point towards some of the issues at stake in liberal anti-colonial arguments more generally.
dc.format.extent283 - 301
dc.publisherSAGE Publications (UK and US)
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of International Political Theory
dc.titleAdam Smith and Colonialism
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1755088214539412
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of International Political Theory
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of International Political Theory
pubs.issue3
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences & Law
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences & Law/Politics and International Relations - Staff
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume10


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Return to top