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dc.contributor.authorJaekel, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorPluess, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBelsky, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWolke, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T12:29:24Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9630en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1111/jcpp.12331
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/9646
dc.description.abstract© 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Background Differential Susceptibility Theory (DST) postulates that some children are more affected - for better and for worse - by developmental experiences, including parenting, than others. Low birth weight (LBW, 1,500-2,499 g) may not only be a predictor for neurodevelopmental impairment but also a marker for prenatally programmed susceptibility. The aim was to test if effects of sensitive parenting on LBW and very LBW (VLBW, <1,500 g) versus normal birth weight (NBW, ≥2,500 g) children's academic achievement are best explained by a differential susceptibility versus diathesis-stress model of person-X-environment interaction. Methods Nine hundred and twenty-two children ranging from 600 g to 5,140 g birth weight were studied as part of a prospective, geographically defined, longitudinal investigation of neonatal at-risk children in South Germany (Bavarian Longitudinal Study). Sensitive parenting during a structured mother-child interaction task was observed and rated at age 6 years. Academic achievement was assessed with standardized mathematic, reading, and spelling/writing tests at age 8 years. Results Maternal sensitivity positively predicted the academic achievement of both LBW (n = 283) and VLBW (n = 202) children. Confirmatory-comparative and model-fitting analysis (testing LBW vs. NBW and VLBW vs. NBW) indicated that LBW and VLBW children were more susceptible than NBW to the adverse effects of low-sensitive, but not beneficial effects of high-sensitive parenting. Conclusions Findings proved more consistent with the diathesis stress than differential-susceptibility model of person-X-environment interaction: LBW and VLBW children's exposure to positive parenting predicted catch-up to their NBW peers, whereas exposure to negative parenting predicted much poorer functioning.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by grant JA 1913 from the German Research Foundation (DFG) and by grants PKE24, JUG14, 01EP9504, and 01ER0801 from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Science(BMBF).en_US
dc.format.extent693 - 701en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplinesen_US
dc.titleEffects of maternal sensitivity on low birth weight children's academic achievement: A test of differential susceptibility versus diathesis stressen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 1999-2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jcpp.12331en_US
pubs.issue6en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume56en_US


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