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dc.contributor.authorMARINAKIS, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward,, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T11:18:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-12en_US
dc.date.submitted2015-11-30T14:12:38.655Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/9477
dc.description.abstractNitric oxide is a free radical, because it has one unpaired electron. This creates weak, short-lived complexes with a variety of species, which makes experimental investigations hard. Theoretical investigations are also quite involved because the spin of the unpaired electron can interact with the rotating motion of the complex and the nuclear spin of nitrogen. We also need to take into account that the unpaired electron can be either in the plane or perpendicular to the molecular plane, resulting in different molecular properties.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe acknowledge EPSRC Grant No. EP/H008403/1 awarded to Professor Brian J. Howard (Oxford University), the Centre for Public Engagement (Queen Mary, University of London) for funding, and Lis Carter for help in the recording.en_US
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcast
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcast
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcast
dc.format.mediumMP3 Podcasten_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrowave studies of nitrosyl complexesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMicrowave studies of nitrosyl complexes;
dc.rightsYou may not, without prior permission upload this Podcast to another website.
dc.subjectnitric oxideen_US
dc.subjectfree radicalen_US
dc.subjectunpaired electronen_US
dc.subjectnitric oxide complexesen_US
dc.titleSetting the problemen_US
dc.rights.holder(c) 2015 Marinakis, S and Howard, B
pubs.issueEpisode 3en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US


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