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dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, C
dc.contributor.editorDenisoff, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T14:46:56Z
dc.date.available2020-05-04
dc.date.available2020-06-22T14:46:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-31
dc.identifier.issn1060-1503
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/65116
dc.description.abstractIt is usual to put the New Woman writer Sarah Grand alongside Oscar Wilde to mark their differences. However, this essay suggests that these two authors had more in common than at first appears, both with regards to the fashioning of their literary identities and to their literary productions. Grand’s compendious best-selling novel The Heavenly Twins (1893) is usually seen as a realist fiction, but its Interlude titled ‘The Tenor and the Boy’, which was actually composed much earlier, presents a standalone narrative that owes more to the romance mode and is much more playful in tone and spirit. It also deals with the decadent theme of the secret double life, although crucially and dramatically Grand focuses on female subterfuge. After juxtaposing Wilde’s ‘Lady Alroy’ (1887), another text about the female double life, with Grand’s Interlude, I subsequently consider decadent qualities common to both ‘The Tenor and the Boy’ and other Wildean texts including theatricality, doubling, gender ambiguity, and queer desire.en_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofVictorian Literature and Culture
dc.titleSarah Grand and Oscar Wilde: Decadence, Desire, and the Double Lifeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.issueNot yet knownen_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusAccepteden_US
pubs.volumeNot yet knownen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-04


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