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dc.contributor.authorDuff, Den_US
dc.contributor.editorBertoneche, Cen_US
dc.contributor.editorElprin, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-08T13:51:42Z
dc.date.available2020-06-08en_US
dc.date.issued2020-09-01en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-195Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/64707
dc.descriptionspecial issue on 'Keats and the Odes (1820-2020)'en_US
dc.description.abstractThis article reappraises the Romantic ode through the concept of ‘brinkmanship’ introduced by Edward Young in 1728 and revived and developed by Coleridge. Young portrays the Pindaric ode as a risk-taking genre which appears wild and “immethodical” but “has as much Logick at the bottom, as Aristotle, or Euclid”. Coleridge elaborates this poetic “logic” and makes the idea of opposed but harmonized mental forces part of his theory of imagination. His critical speculations illuminate his own ode-writing and that of other Romantic poets who use the genre self-reflexively, to test the limits of imagination and explore its workings. The article focusses on Wordsworth’s “Intimations Ode” and Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale”, emphasizing their imaginative audacity, their strategic deployment of Pindaric devices such as transitions, apostrophes and paradoxes, and their daring intertextuality. Aspects of Keats’s odes normally taken as signs of Horatian restraint are interpreted instead as distinctive displays of Pindaric brinkmanship.en_US
dc.publisherDidier-Eruditionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEtudes anglaises (Periodical)en_US
dc.titleThe Romantic Ode and the Art of Brinkmanshipen_US
dc.typeArticle
pubs.issue3en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusAccepteden_US
pubs.volume73en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-08en_US


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