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dc.contributor.authorBien, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorBölte, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwitserlood, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T09:04:46Z
dc.date.available2014-12-13en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/6447
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2015 Bien, Bölte and Zwitserlood. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the role of the syllable during speech processing in German, in an auditory-auditory fragment priming study with lexical decision and simultaneous EEG registration. Spoken fragment primes either shared segments (related) with the spoken targets or not (unrelated), and this segmental overlap either corresponded to the first syllable of the target (e.g., /teis/ - /teisti/), or not (e.g., /teis/ - /teistləs/). Similar prime conditions applied for word and pseudoword targets. Lexical decision latencies revealed facilitation due to related fragments that corresponded to the first syllable of the target (/teis/ - /teisti/). Despite segmental overlap, there were no positive effects for related fragments that mismatched the first syllable. No facilitation was observed for pseudowords. The EEG analyses showed a consistent effect of relatedness, independent of syllabic match, from 200 to 500 ms, including the P350 and N400 windows. Moreover, this held for words and pseudowords that differed however in the N400 window. The only specific effect of syllabic match for related prime-target pairs was observed in the time window from 200 to 300 ms. We discuss the nature and potential origin of these effects, and their relevance for speech processing and lexical access.en_US
dc.format.extent1544 - ?en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFront Psycholen_US
dc.subjectERPsen_US
dc.subjectGerman languageen_US
dc.subjectform primingen_US
dc.subjectfragment primingen_US
dc.subjectlexical accessen_US
dc.subjectlexical decisionen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectsyllablesen_US
dc.titleDo syllables play a role in German speech perception? Behavioral and electrophysiological data from primed lexical decision.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01544en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25628584en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.notesThe work was undertaken at the University of Muenster, Germany, and supported by a German Science Foundation priority grant. During the revision process, I, as first author, took on a post at Queen Mary University London.en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine/Psychiatry
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
pubs.volume5en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-13en_US
qmul.funderNeural and psychological correlates of phonological categories (Subproject of SPP 1234: Sprachlautliche Kompetenz: Zwischen Grammatik, Signalverarbeitung und neuronaler Aktivität) - 2nd Round of Funding::Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaften_US


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