Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShiach, Men_US
dc.contributor.editorPoplawski, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-26T12:39:26Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21en_US
dc.date.issued2020-08-19en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-2473en_US
dc.identifier.other12
dc.identifier.other12
dc.identifier.other12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/64342
dc.description.abstractThis article considers the power of the general strike as an enabling ‘myth’ within in a range of literary texts from the 1920s that address the specific historical meanings of the 1926 General Strike. It also considers the legacies of such early-twentieth-century engagements with a collective refusal to work for the understanding of political subjectivity in the 2020s.en_US
dc.format.extent166 - 180 (14)en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherMHRAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofYearbook of English Studiesen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Strikeen_US
dc.subjectHugh MacDiarmiden_US
dc.subjectHarold Heslopen_US
dc.subjectD. H. Lawrenceen_US
dc.subjectNaomi Mitchisonen_US
dc.subjectRefusal to Worken_US
dc.titleThe Refusal to Work and the Representation of Political Subjectivity in the 1920s and 2020sen_US
dc.typeArticle
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.qmul.ac.uk/sed/staff/shiachm.htmlen_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusAccepteden_US
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.mhra.org.uk/journalsen_US
pubs.volume50en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-02-21en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record