Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRoberts, MAJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-22T14:14:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-02en_US
dc.identifier.issn0071-1365en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/63694
dc.description.abstract<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>DNA present in all our cells acts as a template by which cells are built. The human genome project, reading the code of the DNA within our cells, completed in 2003, is undoubtedly one of the great achievements of modern bioscience. Our ability to achieve this and to further understand and manipulate DNA has been tightly linked to our understanding of the bacterial and viral world. Outside of the science, the ability to understand and manipulate this code has far-reaching implications for society. In this article, we explore some of the basic techniques that enable us to read, copy and manipulate DNA sequences alongside a brief consideration of some of the implications for society.</jats:p>en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPortland Press Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEssays in Biochemistryen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.titleRecombinant DNA technology and DNA sequencingen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderThe authors
dc.identifier.doi10.1042/ebc20180039en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-02en_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC-BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC-BY