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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeke, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorDain, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorPriebe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBridle, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorAylen, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamjaun, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorKanzaria, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T10:28:25Z
dc.date.issued2018-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436951/pdf/DialoguesClinNeurosci-20-327.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/59839
dc.description.abstractAdults presenting to maxillofacial surgery services are at high risk of psychological morbidity. This study examined the prevalence of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, drug and alcohol use, and appearance-related distress among maxillofacial trauma outpatients over medium-term follow-up. It also explored socio-demographic and injury-related variables associated with psychological distress to inform targeted psychological screening protocols for maxillofacial trauma services. Significant associations were found between level of distress at time of injury and number of traumatic life events with levels of depression at 3 months. No significant associations were found between predictor variables and PTSD at 3 months, or with any psychiatric diagnosis at 6 months. The lack of evidence for an identifiable subgroup of patients who were at higher risk of psychological distress indicated that routine screening of all maxillofacial trauma outpatients should be offered in order to best respond to their mental health needs. The feasibility of the medical team facilitating this is challenging and should ideally be undertaken by psychologists integrated within the MDT. This study led to the funding of a clinical psychologist to provide collaborative care with the maxillofacial surgeons, resulting in brief assessment and treatment to over 600 patients in the first year of the service.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by a Barts Charity Small Project Grant (formerly the Barts and the London Charity).en_US
dc.format.extent327 - 339en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDialogues Clin Neuroscien_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution License
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectfacial injuryen_US
dc.subjectpsychological morbidityen_US
dc.subjectscreeningen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAmbulatory Care Facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectAnxiety Disordersen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectFacial Injuriesen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subjectPredictive Value of Testsen_US
dc.subjectPrevalenceen_US
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subjectStress Disorders, Post-Traumaticen_US
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.titlePrevalence and predictive factors of psychological morbidity following facial injury: a prospective study of patients attending a maxillofacial outpatient clinic within a major UK city.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder2018 AICH - Servier Group. All rights reserved
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30936771en_US
pubs.issue4en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume20en_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US


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