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dc.contributor.authorGiacco, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorBird, VJen_US
dc.contributor.authorAhmad, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLasalvia, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLorant, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorMiglietta, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMoskalewicz, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicaise, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorPfennig, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelbel, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorPriebe, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-08T08:33:02Z
dc.date.available2018-11-04en_US
dc.date.issued2018-12-18en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-7960en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/54163
dc.description.abstractAimsA core question in the debate about how to organise mental healthcare is whether in- and out-patient treatment should be provided by the same (personal continuity) or different psychiatrists (specialisation). The controversial debate drives costly organisational changes in several European countries, which have gone in opposing directions. The existing evidence is based on small and low-quality studies which tend to favour whatever the new experimental organisation is.We compared 1-year clinical outcomes of personal continuity and specialisation in routine care in a large scale study across five European countries. METHODS: This is a 1-year prospective natural experiment conducted in Belgium, England, Germany, Italy and Poland. In all these countries, both personal continuity and specialisation exist in routine care. Eligible patients were admitted for psychiatric in-patient treatment (18 years of age), and clinically diagnosed with a psychotic, mood or anxiety/somatisation disorder.Outcomes were assessed 1 year after the index admission. The primary outcome was re-hospitalisation and analysed for the full sample and subgroups defined by country, and different socio-demographic and clinical criteria. Secondary outcomes were total number of inpatient days, involuntary re-admissions, adverse events and patients' social situation. Outcomes were compared through mixed regression models in intention-to-treat analyses. The study is registered (ISRCTN40256812). RESULTS: We consecutively recruited 7302 patients; 6369 (87.2%) were followed-up. No statistically significant differences were found in re-hospitalisation, neither overall (adjusted percentages: 38.9% in personal continuity, 37.1% in specialisation; odds ratio = 1.08; confidence interval 0.94-1.25; p = 0.28) nor for any of the considered subgroups. There were no significant differences in any of the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Whether the same or different psychiatrists provide in- and out-patient treatment appears to have no substantial impact on patient outcomes over a 1-year period. Initiatives to improve long-term outcomes of psychiatric patients may focus on aspects other than the organisation of personal continuity v. specialisation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission Seventh Framework Programme. Grant agreement 602645en_US
dc.format.extent1 - 9en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiol Psychiatr Scien_US
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.*
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectHealth servicesen_US
dc.subjectoutcomesen_US
dc.subjectpersonal continuityen_US
dc.subjectspecialisationen_US
dc.subjecttreatmenten_US
dc.titleThe same or different psychiatrists for in- and out-patient treatment? A multi-country natural experiment.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© Cambridge University Press 2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S2045796018000732en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30560756en_US
pubs.notesNo embargoen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US


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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.