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dc.contributor.authorGLASHEEN, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T12:05:33Z
dc.date.available2018-08-13en_US
dc.date.submitted2018-10-26T12:26:49.458Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-8034en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/52103
dc.description.abstractThe 1946 Ealing film Hue and Cry is famous for its extensive shots of children playing among bombsites filmed on location in London. Following the film’s release a number of people, led by Lady Allen of Hurtwood, advocated turning city bombsites into adventure playgrounds. Yet the relationship between how the film and adventure playground literature imagined the reconstruction of London has not been properly explored. This article uses close reading of Hue and Cry to investigate the meanings that play and the bombsite have within the film. It frames this analysis by use of adventure playground archives, printed pamphlets and books. In doing so it demonstrates that the film sits within a set of responses to bombsite play that reimagined the role of the child in rebuilding London. It argues that Hue and Cry was unique in representing children’s play in bombsites as enabling them to reshape space and society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLondon Journalen_US
dc.subjectBombsitesen_US
dc.subjectPlaygroundsen_US
dc.subjectLondonen_US
dc.subjectHue and Cryen_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectReconstructionen_US
dc.titleBombsites, adventure playgrounds and the reconstruction of London: playing with urban space in Hue and Cryen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© 2018 Informa UK Limited
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03058034.2018.1533087en_US
pubs.notes18 monthsen_US
pubs.publication-statusAccepteden_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-13en_US


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