Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMurray, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorKrahé, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodsman, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T13:49:19Z
dc.date.available2018-06-08en_US
dc.date.issued2018-10en_US
dc.date.submitted2018-06-14T09:45:08.892Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/41523
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The term 'moral injury' may be useful in conceptualising the negative psychological effects of delivering emergency and prehospital medicine as it provides a non-pathological framework for understanding these effects. This is in contrast to concepts such as burnout and post-traumatic stress disorder which suggest practitioners have reached a crisis point. We conducted an exploratory, pilot study to determine whether the concept of moral injury resonated with medical students working in emergency medicine and what might mitigate that injury for them. METHODS: Structured interviews and focus groups were carried out with medical students involved in the delivery of prehospital and emergency medicine. The study was carried out at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry in May and June 2017. The data were analysed using theoretically driven thematic analysis. RESULTS: Concepts of moral injury such as witnessing events which contravene one's moral code, especially those involving children, or acts of violence, resonated with the experiences of medical students in this study. Participants stated that having more medical knowledge and a clear sense of a job to do on scene helped reduce their distress at the time. While social support was a protective factor, not all students found the process of debrief easy to access or undergo, those with more established relationships with colleagues fared better in this regard. CONCLUSIONS: The term moral injury is useful in exploring the experience of medical students in emergency medicine. More effort should be made to ensure that students effectively access debrief and other support opportunities. It is hoped that future work will be undertaken with different professional groups and explore the potential psychological and neuropsychological impact of witnessing trauma.en_US
dc.format.extent590 - 594en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEmerg Med Jen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See:©http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
dc.subjectfirst respondersen_US
dc.subjectparamedicsen_US
dc.subjectprehospital careen_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectstaff supporten_US
dc.titleAre medical students in prehospital care at risk of moral injury?en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© Author(s) 2018.
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emermed-2017-207216en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29945983en_US
pubs.issue10en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume35en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-08en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record