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dc.contributor.authorSHAH, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-30T10:04:09Z
dc.date.issued2011-03en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/3321
dc.descriptionThis paper discusses the increasingly transnational and trans-jurisdictional activities that members of diasporic communities engage in, and the ways in which members of such communities may experience legal penalties within Western legal systems for such engagements. With a focus on British legal systems and some European jurisprudence, the paper outlines the ways in which trans-jurisdictional marriages and divorces have become two key areas where penalties may be experienced. The writer argues that this not only poses problems for the ways in which domestic legal systems in Europe may impose unjust results for those diasporic communities, but goes on to suggest that, for a more just global legal order, the basis of private international law rules in the principle of the ‘comity of nations’ may have to be rethought by its transformation to that of a ‘comity of peoples’.
dc.descriptionThis paper discusses the increasingly transnational and trans-jurisdictional activities that members of diasporic communities engage in, and the ways in which members of such communities may experience legal penalties within Western legal systems for such engagements. With a focus on British legal systems and some European jurisprudence, the paper outlines the ways in which trans-jurisdictional marriages and divorces have become two key areas where penalties may be experienced. The writer argues that this not only poses problems for the ways in which domestic legal systems in Europe may impose unjust results for those diasporic communities, but goes on to suggest that, for a more just global legal order, the basis of private international law rules in the principle of the ‘comity of nations’ may have to be rethought by its transformation to that of a ‘comity of peoples’.
dc.descriptionThis paper discusses the increasingly transnational and trans-jurisdictional activities that members of diasporic communities engage in, and the ways in which members of such communities may experience legal penalties within Western legal systems for such engagements. With a focus on British legal systems and some European jurisprudence, the paper outlines the ways in which trans-jurisdictional marriages and divorces have become two key areas where penalties may be experienced. The writer argues that this not only poses problems for the ways in which domestic legal systems in Europe may impose unjust results for those diasporic communities, but goes on to suggest that, for a more just global legal order, the basis of private international law rules in the principle of the ‘comity of nations’ may have to be rethought by its transformation to that of a ‘comity of peoples’.en_US
dc.descriptionThis paper discusses the increasingly transnational and trans-jurisdictional activities that members of diasporic communities engage in, and the ways in which members of such communities may experience legal penalties within Western legal systems for such engagements. With a focus on British legal systems and some European jurisprudence, the paper outlines the ways in which trans-jurisdictional marriages and divorces have become two key areas where penalties may be experienced. The writer argues that this not only poses problems for the ways in which domestic legal systems in Europe may impose unjust results for those diasporic communities, but goes on to suggest that, for a more just global legal order, the basis of private international law rules in the principle of the ‘comity of nations’ may have to be rethought by its transformation to that of a ‘comity of peoples’.en_US
dc.description.abstractSee notesen_US
dc.format.extent? - ? (18)en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRELIGARE Working Paperen_US
dc.subjectPrivate international lawen_US
dc.subjectConflicts of lawen_US
dc.subjectEthnic minoritiesen_US
dc.subjectCultural diversityen_US
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectTransnationalismen_US
dc.subjectTransnational lawen_US
dc.titleTransnational family relations in migration contexts: British variations on European themesen_US
pubs.author-urlhttp://www.law.qmul.ac.uk/staff/shah.htmlen_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.religareproject.eu/content/transnational-family-relations-migration-contexts-british-variations-european-themesen_US


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