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dc.contributor.authorSadowska, Anna Danuta
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-12T12:42:22Z
dc.date.available2012-11-12T12:42:22Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/2963
dc.descriptionPhDen_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, there has been a considerable growth in applications of multi-robot systems as opposed to single-robot systems. This thesis presents our proposed solutions to a formation control problem in which mobile robots are required to create a desired formation shape and track a desired trajectory as a whole. In the first instance, we study the formation control problem for unicycle mobile robots. We propose two control algorithms based on a cascaded approach: one based on a kinematic model of a robot and the other based on a dynamic model. We also propose a saturated controller in which actuator limitations are explicitly accounted for. To demonstrate how the control algorithms work, we present an extensive simulation and experimental study. Thereafter we move on to formation control algorithms in which the coordination error is explicitly defined. Thus, we are able to give conditions for robots keeping their desired formation shape without necessarily tracking the desired trajectory. We also introduce a controller in which both trajectory tracking and formation shape maintenance are achieved as well as a saturated algorithm. We validate the applicability of the introduced controllers in simulations and experiments. Lastly, we study the formation control problem for car-like robots. In this case we develop a controller using the backstepping technique. We give conditions for robots keeping their desired formation shape while failing to track their desired trajectories and present simulation results to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed controlleren_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.titleFormation control of nonholonomic mobile robots: the virtual structure approachen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.holderThe copyright of this thesis rests with the author and no quotation from it or information derived from it may be published without the prior written consent of the author


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    Theses Awarded by Queen Mary University of London

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