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dc.contributor.authorMillar, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeale, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurton, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilks, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCosteloe, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodford, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorJuszczak, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorWhiley, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanton, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorWareham, DWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-22T10:06:55Z
dc.date.available2015-12-03en_US
dc.date.issued2016-05en_US
dc.date.submitted2016-01-19T13:07:12.689Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/11990
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to characterize ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae present in 24 neonatal units (NNUs) in eight networks participating in a multicentre probiotic study and to test the hypothesis that specific strains would cluster within individual units and networks. METHODS: We performed analysis of stool samples for the presence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae at 2 weeks post-natal age and 36 weeks post-menstrual age. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were characterized and typed using molecular methods. RESULTS: ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 71) were isolated from 67/1229 (5.5%) infants from whom we received a sample at either sampling time or both sampling times, and from infants in 18 (75%) of the 24 recruiting NNUs. Thirty-three Escherichia coli, 23 Klebsiella spp. and 6 Enterobacter spp. strains were characterized. ESBL-producing E. coli were all distinguishable within individual NNUs by antibiotic resistance genotype, serogroup (O25b), phenotype, phylotype or ST. Ten of the 33 were ST131 and 9 of the 10 ST131 isolates were ciprofloxacin resistant. Seven of the 10 ST131 isolates carried genes encoding CTX-M group 1 enzymes. ST131 isolates were isolated from centres within five of the eight NNU networks. There were clusters of indistinguishable ESBL-producing Klebsiella and Enterobacter isolates associated with specific NNUs. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of E. coli ST131 were distributed across neonatal networks in the south of England. There was no evidence of clustering of clonally related ESBL-producing E. coli strains, by contrast with Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., which did cluster within units. The possibility that ESBL-producing E. coli strains are spread by vertical transmission requires further investigation.en_US
dc.format.extent1174 - 1177en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJ Antimicrob Chemotheren_US
dc.subjectCluster Analysisen_US
dc.subjectEnglanden_US
dc.subjectEnterobacteriaceaeen_US
dc.subjectEnterobacteriaceae Infectionsen_US
dc.subjectFecesen_US
dc.subjectGenetic Variationen_US
dc.subjectGenotypeen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectInfanten_US
dc.subjectInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Typingen_US
dc.subjectbeta-Lactamasesen_US
dc.titleESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in 24 neonatal units and associated networks in the south of England: no clustering of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in units or networks.en_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© The Author 2016
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jac/dkv459en_US
pubs.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26755494en_US
pubs.issue5en_US
pubs.notesNot knownen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry/Blizard Institute/Immunobiology
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF/REF - SMD - Blizard
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume71en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-03en_US


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