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dc.contributor.authorNichols, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuggs, RJAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-15T16:39:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/11495
dc.description.abstractPast reproductive interactions among incompletely isolated species may leave behind a trail of introgressed alleles, shedding light on historical range movements. Betula pubescens is a widespread native tetraploid tree species in Britain, occupying habitats intermediate to those of its native diploid relatives, B. pendula and B. nana. Genotyping 1134 trees from the three species at 12 microsatellite loci, we found evidence of introgression from both diploid species into B. pubescens, despite the ploidy difference. Surprisingly, introgression from B. nana, a dwarf species whose present range is highly restricted in northern, high-altitude peat bogs, was greater than introgression from B. pendula, which is morphologically similar to B. pubescens and has a substantially overlapping range. A cline of introgression from B. nana was found extending into B. pubescens populations far to the south of the current B. nana range. We suggest that this genetic pattern is a footprint of a historical decline and/or northwards shift in the range of B. nana populations due to climate warming in the Holocene. This is consistent with pollen records that show a broader, more southerly distribution of B. nana in the past. Ecological niche modelling predicts that B. nana is adapted to a larger range than it currently occupies, suggesting additional factors such as grazing and hybridization may have exacerbated its decline. We found very little introgression between B. nana and B. pendula, despite both being diploid, perhaps because their distributions in the past have rarely overlapped. Future conservation of B. nana may partly depend on minimization of hybridization with B. pubescens, and avoidance of planting B. pendula near B. nana populations. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.format.extent2771 - 2782en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Ecologyen_US
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.titleMolecular footprints of the Holocene retreat of dwarf birch in Britainen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.12768en_US
pubs.issue11en_US
pubs.notesIndefiniteen_US
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Science & Engineering
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Science & Engineering/Biological and Chemical Sciences - Biology - Research Students
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty of Science & Engineering/Biological and Chemical Sciences - Staff
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty Reporting - Research Students
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/Faculty Reporting - Research Students/Faculty of Science & Engineering PGRs
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF
pubs.organisational-group/Queen Mary University of London/REF/REF - UoA 05
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
pubs.volume23en_US
qmul.funderGenomic patterns of introgression between hybridising birch species due to range shifts caused by climate change in the Scottish Highlands::NERCen_US


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